College of Human Development Learning Outcomes

Submitted August 31, 1999

Learning outcomes for all undergraduate students

We expect our STUDENTS to have the ability, motivation and initiative to:

Below is a list of specific program names, to view outcomes specific to individual programs, click on the name of that program:


 Nutrition & Foodservice Management

 return to top


  1. Nutrition (DPD) And
     
  2. Dietetics Program (CP)
    Students will be able to:
    1. Communication Knowledge & Skills
      • Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills;
      • Develop, communicate and assess appropriate nutrition interventions;
      • Demonstrate a client-centered approach to education and counseling;
      • Apply theory in education and counseling;
      • Apply technology to obtain, analyze and communicate information.

       
    2. Physical and Biological Sciences Knowledge lL Skills
      • Understand the physiological/chemical context for nutrition.

       
    3. Social Sciences Knowledge & Skills
      • Understand food and nutrition in policy and legislation;
      • Appreciate the cultural, social, economic and psychological context of food and nutrition.

       
    4. Research Knowledge & Skills
      • Demonstrate the ability to critically interpret written and graphic information;
      • Identify key issues, collect information, and manipulate and interpret data to solve problems.

       
    5. Food Knowledge & Skills
      • Demonstrate knowledge of food composition & portion size;
      • Apply food safety and sanitation principles;
      • Demonstrate culinary techniques/food science principles;
      • Understand the role of food choice in providing an adequate, healthy and enjoyable diet;
      • Identify historical/current societal/future trends related to nutrition and dietary habits;
      • Plan menus for community and clinical settings taking into consideration cultural, economic, resources and life stage;
      • Understand existing community programs and resources;
      • Understand issues regarding access to food for individuals, families and communities.

       
    6. Nutrition Knowledge & Skills
      • Identify the role of nutrients in human health;
      • Identify nutrition issues and concerns across the lifespan;
      • Understand applications of nutrition science in the physiological system;
      • Understand the pathophysiology of disease and nutritional implications;
      • Collect, interpret and integrate pertinent anthropometric, biochemical, clinical and dietary information in a nutritional status assessment;
      • Modify diets according to specific disease states;
      • Assess, design and evaluate programs and interventions for individuals and groups.

       
    7. Management Knowledge & Skills
      • Understand management theory, facilities/operations, food delivery systems and human resources;
      • Determine costs of service/operation, prepare budget and interpret financial data;
      • Plan, monitor and evaluate programs.

       
    8. Health Care Systems Knowledge & Skills
      • Understand health care issues in policy and legislation.

       
    9. Professional Development
      • Assess their own intellectual and professional development progress;
      • Demonstrate professional and ethical behavior;
      • Demonstrate the ability to work independently and collaboratively;
      • Understand professional challenges in dietetics/nutrition.

       
    10. HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
      Learning outcomes are based on faculty judgement and guided by CHRIE (Council on Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Education) accreditation
      standards.
       
      The curriculum provides students with a common body of knowledge in hospitality administration and also a broad education and awareness of values, skills and attitudes that will prepare them for imaginative and responsible roles in business and society. It enables them to understand and apply the concepts of problem solving.
       
      1. General Education
        Studies in areas other than the purely professional are important in The education of hospitality administrators. Students must have an opportunity for study in the natural and physical sciences and communication as well as in the arts and humanities.

      2. Hospitality administration
        Knowledge and understanding of the general principles of the following areas and specific applications in hospitality management including:
        • Historical overview of the hospitality industry and the profession;
        • Production of hospitality goods and services;
        • Operations relative to the provision of hospitality goods and/or services, including foodservice management and/or lodging management and related services;
        • Financial management of hospitality goods and services;
        • Economic environment of profit and non-profit organizations;
        • Legal environment of profit and non-profit organizations;
        • Ethical considerations and socio-political influences affecting organizations;
        • Quantitative methods and management information systems, including computer applications;
        • Planning for, utilization, and management of personnel, including an understanding of human behavior;
        • Organization theory, behavior and interpersonal communication;
        • Administrative processes, including analysis and policy determination at the management level; and
        • Exposure to sufficient areas of specialization areas to develop individual student interest and talents.

         
      3. Work experience
        Relevant operational and/or management experience in the hospitality industry with guidance and supervision guaranteed by the industry and the academic program.
         
      4. NUTRITION SCIENCE
        In the following areas students will be able to:
        1. Communication Knowledge & Skills
          • Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills;
          • Develop, communicate and assess appropriate nutrition interventions;
          • Apply technology to obtain, analyze and communicate information.

           
        2. Physical and Biological Sciences Knowledge & Skills
          • Understand the physiological/chemical context for nutrition. Context for nutrition and the health professions.

           
        3. Social Sciences Knowledge & Skills
          • Appreciate the cultural, social, economic and psychological context of food and nutrition.

           
        4. Research Knowledge & Skills
          • Demonstrate the ability to critically interpret written and graphic information;
          • Identify key issues, collect information, and manipulate and interpret data to solve problems;
          • Demonstrate techniques used in a chemistry, physics, and physiology laboratory to do research and solve problems.

           
        5. Knowledge & Skills (if taken as electives)
          • Demonstrate knowledge of food composition & portion size;
          • Apply food safety and sanitation principles;
          • Demonstrate culinary techniques/food science principles;
          • Understand the role of food choice in providing an adequate, healthy and enjoyable diet;
          • Identify historical/current societal/future trends related to nutrition and dietary habits;
          • Plan menus for community and clinical settings taking into consideration cultural, economic, resources and life stage;
          • Understand existing community programs and resources;
          • Understand issues regarding access to food for individuals, families and communities.

           
        6. Nutrition Knowledge & Skills
          • Identify the role of nutrients in human health;
          • Identify nutrition issues and concerns across the lifespan;
          • Understand applications of nutrition science in the physiological system;
          • Understand the pathophysiology of disease and nutritional implications;
          • Collect, interpret and integrate pertinent anthropometric, biochemical, clinical and dietary information in a nutritional status assessment;
          • Modify diets according to specific disease states;
          • Assess, design and evaluate programs and interventions for individuals and groups.

           
        7. Health Care Systems Knowledge & Skills
          • Understand health care issues in policy and legislation.

           
        8. Professional Development
          • Assess their own intellectual and professional development progress;
          • Demonstrate professional and ethical behavior;
          • Demonstrate the ability to work independently and collaboratively;
          • Understand professional challenges in dietetics/nutrition/health professions.

           
        9. Nutrition Science students should
          • Be prepared in scientific subjects in order to earn high grades on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) or other admission test for health professional advanced degree.
          • Earn high grades in sciences with at least a 3.5 overall grade point average to be considered for admission to graduate school;
          • Learn about health professional school applications and letters of recommendation from the Health Professional Advisory Program, 312 hall of Languages, by the end of the sophmore year;
          • Take at least 3 credit hours of Community Internship Program or work in the summer in a health profession setting;
          • Understand that if they wish to transfer to the DPD Nutrition program, they must do this before their junior year.


      Environmental Arts, Consumer Studies, Retailing

       return to top


        Students in the ECR department choose to study in two general areas. One is chicfly concerned with design and the other with the consumer and the marketplace. The various curriculums offered are intended to relate these two broad areas and to educate the students in that relationship. The following three outcomes are considered common to both groups of students.

        General Education
        Students will demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the natural and physical sciences plus the arts and humanities in addition to specific areas of professionally-related study.

        Design and Marketplace Awareness
        Students will understand the relationship between design, product development and the marketplace and apply theories.

        Communication Knowledge and Skills
        Students will demonstrate effective oral and written presentation skills and competent use of computer technology.

        Research Knowledge and Skills
        Students will demonstrate their ability to identify issues, collect information, and critically interpret data to solve problems.

      1. RETAILING & RETAILING/MARKETING
        Students will be able to:
        1. Consumers and the Marketplace
          • Demonstrate their knowledge of the U.S. consumer market and segments;
          • Demonstrate a knowledge of the history and current status of consumer protection and regulatory responses to market failures;
          • Understand basic economic principles, pricing, quality and customer service issues;
          • Understand basic consumer law governing consumer transactions.

           
        2. Business and the Marketplace
          • Demonstrate a clear understanding of the U.S. business/retail mix, distribution channels, global marketplace plus the structure, marketing and management of product and of organizations; Demonstrate an understanding of basic accounting and financial principles, together with applied retailing math skills;
          • Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary and traditional ethical issues facing individuals and corporations;
          • Demonstrate and apply knowledge successfully in supervised full-time employment in a consumer-related organization or retail business.

        3. CONSUMER STUDIES

          Vision: The Consumer Studies Program will be a premier center for applied learning which prepares leaders and advances knowledge and practice in fields related to consumers and the marketplace.

          Mission: As an integral part of a leading student-centered private research university, Syracuse University's Consumer Studies program fosters professional, intellectual, and personal development. It also instills the values articulated by President John F. Kennedy in his 1962 Consumer Bill of Rights when he set forth the consumer's right to choice, information, safety, and to be heard. The curriculum promotes an understanding of legal and ethical responsibilities of all providers of goods and services-in both the public and private sectors-toward their consumers.

          Our goal is to equip students with the strategic skills to secure positions in business, education, or government. Students will be able to:

          1. Consumers and the Marketplace
            • Demonstrate their knowledge of the U.S. consumer market and its segments;
            • Demonstrate a knowledge of the history and current status of consumer protection and regulatory responses to market failures;
            • Understand basic economic principles, pricing, quality and customer service Issues;
            • Understand basic consumer law governing consumer transactions.

             
          2. Business and the Marketplace
            • Demonstrate a clear understanding of the U.S. business/retail mix, distribution channels, global marketplace plus the structure, marketingand management of product and of organizations;
            • Demonstrate an understanding of basic accounting and financialprinciples, together with applied retailing math skills;
            • Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary and traditional ethical issues facing individuals and corporations;
            • Demonstrate and apply knowledge successfully in supervised full-time employment in a consumer-related organization or retail business.

             
          3. ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN/INTERIORS, FASHION DESIGN, & TEXTILE DESIGN
            Students will be able to:
            • Demonstrate technical skills to succeed in their respective fields;
            • Produce studio work that is conceptually relevant, skillfully crafted and suitable for its end purpose;
            • Understand cultural, historical, and philosophical backgrounds of their field, and relate individual areas of design to contemporary culture;
            • Understand the cyclical nature of design and interpret and use the history of their respective design field for fresh insight and re-interpretation;
            • Understand the managerial and fiscal aspects of their design fields and understand marketplace forces and trends;
            • Understand and use the appropriate technology specific to their field;
            • Learn from current leaders of their field by attending lectures at Syracuse University;
            • Complete internships and work experiences for credit and not for credit, that will enhance the understanding of their chosen careers.

             


            Child and Family Studies

             return to top


              We expect our STUDENTS to have the ability, motivation, and initiative to:

              • Demonstrate intellectual curiosity and a thirst for knowledge and lifelong learning;
              • Uphold professional standards of honesty, values, and ethical decision making;
              • Take appropriate responsibility for their own development;
              • Discipline themselves and manage priorities;
              • Read, listen, and clearly express themselves, verbally, in writing, visually, and quantitatively;
              • Become skilled at research, critical analysis, and creative thinking;
              • Employ technology to enhance learning and career opportunities;
              • Develop interpersonal skills in teamwork and leadership;
              • Understand the nature of change-be flexible and adaptive;
              • Appreciate application of academic concepts in the real world.

              Students will be able to:

              1. Theoretical Knowledge about Child and Family Development
                • Discuss/summarize the basic theories in child development and family studies;
                • Discuss/summarize eco-cultural belief structures and other social position variables that affect the lives of children and families;
                • Demonstrate a basic understanding of contemporary directions and issues (e.g., culturally different models, multicultural education);
                • Discuss/summarize the fields of child development and family studies from a sociohistorical perspective.

                 
              2. Observational and Recording Skills and Basic Tools for Research
                • Understanding observation methods and recording aspects in child development and family studies;
                • Evaluate methods of observation and recording skills;
                • Develop questions pertaining to child development and family studies that can be addressed empirically; use existing methods to address conceptual and empirical questions and present findings;
                • Critique current research in child development and family studies;
                • Demonstrate ethical research and recording techniques.

                 
              3. Developmental Processes
                • Understand human development through the lifespan;
                • Summarize the processes inherent in the following developmental domains: physical, cognitive, language, social, emotional, moral;
                • Summarize diversity as it influences developmental processes;
                • Evaluate historical and contemporary approaches to the study of developmental processes.

                 
              4. Professional Development and Supervised Practicum
                • Demonstrate job-seeking skills, including resume-writing and interviewing;
                • Demonstrate interpersonally competent behaviors with colleagues and clients from diverse backgrounds;
                • Demonstrate professional ethics in applied settings, including maintaining confidentiality;
                • Understand the value of and participate in supervision and constructive criticism in professional settings;
                • Identify and become affiliated with the professional organization most relevant to his/her career;
                • Give presentations in which professional skills and interest areas are evident;
                • Adapt to innovation and change in the fields of child and family studies.

                 
              5. Early Childhood Education
                • Discuss/summarize theories and historical approaches to early childhood education;
                • Discuss/summarize tenets of developmentally appropriate practice;
                • Create teaching strategies and techniques reflecting developmentally appropriate practice;
                • Demonstrate teaching strategies and techniques in a professional early childhood setting.


            [back to Ongoing Efforts]